Winamp Visualizations

Winamp Visualizations

Date Released: 2000-2021
License: Free version
Author: N/A
An archive file: 400 MB
OS: Windows, Winamp
Last Updated: January 20, 2021

As a Winamp user you will already be familiar with the fact that WinAmp is a longstanding tool for listening to and cataloguing your music.

Winamp Visualization

It works as a one stop shop for managing your music library and it’s still free.  It allows you to sync your music collection to an MP3 player or smartphone, and you can also stream it over the internet, allowing you to share your favorite tunes with your friends. There have been other cataloguing tools that have come along but for sheer control of your own downloads it still stands out from the crowd as a powerful and customizable tool. WinAmp is also light compared to something like Itunes which has become an insatiable resource muncher. Additionally, you would be hard pressed to find another that’s as open to adding as many additional plug-ins. New skins also help to keep things fresh along with the vast array of plug ins available in the catalogue which give you the ability to boost 3D sound, graphic equalizers, crossfading, and support for the lossless FLAC format but for me the key thing is the visualizations that it allows you to create.

Winamp llama

When it comes to the visualizations there are a few built in standard options but there is still a huge community of current users that are actively developing exceptional plug ins to expand and improve it, so it never stands still. An array of spectral visualizations that you’re able to enjoy while listening to your favorite tracks is one of the best things ever invented. Initially music visualizers were the exclusive concern of music and tech nerds but with the more user friendly and specific plug in’s more people discovered the beauty of what they could create based on the audio frequencies and amplification of each track. Effective music visualization aims to attain a high degree of visual correlation between a track’s specific characteristics and the objects or components of the visual image being rendered and displayed.
These often, spectral visualizations allow you to fully personalise your listening experience onto a real time moving canvass, so you can immerse yourself in your music by creating an ever-changing spectacle of colour and movement. Techniques can range from super simple to gorgeously elaborate, which can often include a multitude and plurality of composited effects. The changes in the music’s loudness and frequency spectrum are often the key.

If you have put your creative side away maybe it’s time to dust of the jacket and take out your vinyl collection or old CD’s and explore the new catalogue available so you can take a walk on the visual wild side.

Huge archive of Winamp Visualizations. Over 2500 files in one archive. Winamp visualization will generate images and video based on the music being played.

Download Winamp Visualizations

Winamp Shortcuts

Winamp Keyboard Shortcuts

Thought this was pretty cool and wanted to share. It’s no big secret and easy to find, but Winamp has a ton of helpful keyboard shortcuts. I’ve copy and pasted the list below, but in case you need to find the list again…

Open your Winamp player, go to your toolbar and click on Help > About Winamp. A dialog box opens, and you’ll see four tabs: Winamp, Credits, Keyboard shortcuts, and Version history. Click on the keyboard shortcuts tab

Keyboard Shortcuts (these can be used in most Winamp windows)

Key Action
—————————————————————————–
F1 Open Help
Ctrl+F1 About Box
Ctrl+A Toggle Always on Top (N/A in playlist editor and media library)
Ctrl+Alt+A Toggle always on top (playlist editor)
Ctrl+W Toggle Windowshade mode (main window, unless in playlist editor)
Ctrl+D Toggle Doublesize Mode
Ctrl+E Toggle Easymove (only applicable in classic skins)
Ctrl+T Toggle Time Display Mode
Alt+W Toggle Main Window
Alt+E Toggle Playlist Editor
Alt+G Toggle Graphical Equalizer
Alt+V Toggle Video Window
Alt+L Toggle Media Library
Ctrl+Tab Cycle through different Winamp windows
Alt+S Go to Skin selection
Ctrl+P Go to Preferences
Alt+F Open Main Menu
Alt+K Configure current visualization plug-in
Ctrl+Sh+K Start/stop current visualization plug-In
Ctrl+K Open visualization plug-in section of preferences
Ctrl+J Jump to time in current track
J or Keypad . Open jump-to-file box
Ctrl+Alt+N Spawn new Winamp instance
Alt+M Minimize Winamp
Ctrl+H Show recently played files/streams (History 🙂

Skin Tutorial

Skin Making Tutorial

Last updated: 28/12/2020
File Size: 2.99 MB

Before creating a complete skin, you will need the following tools. There are some suggestions below, but we don’t necessarily endorse or require you to use any of them. We leave you to choose one that you’re most comfortable with.

Stuff you need:
1. A paint program such as Photoshop, Gimp, or even good old MSPaint will work too. How else will you “paint” your skins? Must be able to recognize the .BMP format.
2. Winamp’s Base 29x Skin – to use as a template.
3. Text Editor – For use in configuring the fonts and colors of the Mini-browser and Playlist editor. Also used if you do any transparency. eg. MS Notepad, MS Word, Corel Wordperfect
4. Icon Editor – You will need an Icon editor if you are hardcore and want to edit the cursors and pointers associated with your skin. eg. NeoSoft Icon Editor, Icon Edit Pro, Impact Microangelo
5. Zip Compression Tool: Absolutely necessary to publish your skin. Winamp.com will not accept an unzipped skin. eg. WinRAR PKZip, WinZip
6. A good imagination and a good attitude 🙂

Winamp-Skin-Tutorial

The general process is pretty easy. Simply create a new folder in your Winamp\Skins directory. For example, go to your Skins directory in file manager, right click, and choose ‘New Folder’. Name the folder something unique, like ‘NewSkin’. Unzip the Winamp Base Skin into that folder using your favorite unzip utility.

Once you’ve installed the Base Skin, you could look at the files in that folder. Inside the folder should be a whole bunch of .cur (cursor) files, a whole bunch of .bmp files, and a few (3) .txt files. All of these files are optional. Any missing files will use Winamp’s defaults. So, for example, you can just change one cursor in a skin by having a single .cur file.

The names for the cursor files are pretty self explanatory. In addition, EQTitle.cur means that this cursor is for the EQ’s title bar. normal.cur is the default cursor used in Winamp’s main window. PWSSize.cur means that this cursor is for the Playlist Editor Window Shade sizing area. and so forth. If in doubt, you can just try making a major change to see where the change takes effect. You will see cursor changes, there’s no need to reload the current skin in Winamp to see them. To edit cursors, we recommend any paint program.

Editing the BMP files is more complicated. ‘pledit.bmp’ changes the look of the Playlist Editor, ‘eqmain.bmp’ changes the look of the Graphical Equalizer, and all the other .bmp files change the look of individual controls of the main interface [why we didn’t just use a single .bmp file for the main interface like we did for the EQ/PL is a different story]. Once you have made modifications to the different BMP files, press F5 in Winamp to re-upload the pictures.

At the end, you can change other aspects of Winamp using the three .txt files included in the Skin. After modifications to these files, be sure to press F5 in Winamp to reload the skin.

Download Skin Pipeline